Tag Archives: Lebanese Cinema

Oscar Predictions 2018: Dunkirk Might Take the Lead!

Just like every year, the 90th Oscar predictions take over the internet and the press depending on multiple observations including the reviews, worldwide reception, subjects of the films, and so on. But this year, the predictions are largely different from one source to another, and the truth is that no one really knows which film’s got a bigger chance than the other in every category, only because every film can win for a reason, depending on the observations. Despite this difficulty in the predictions this year, we will share with you which films we think will win the Oscar in all 24 categories.

Best Picture: Dunkirk | Emma Thomas and Christopher Nolan

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Best Actor in a Leading Role: Gary Oldman in Darkest Hour

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Best Actress in a Leading Role: 
Frances McDormand in Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

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Best Actor in a Supporting Role: Christopher Plummer in All the Money in the World

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Best Actress in a Supporting Role: Allison Janney in I, Tonya

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Best Director: 
Guillermo del Toro for The Shape of Water

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Best Original Screenplay: Lady Bird by Greta Gerwig
 
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Best Adapted Screenplay: Call Me by Your Name by James Ivory
 
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Best Cinematography: Hoyte Van Hoytema for Dunkirk
 
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Best Sound Mixing: Dunkirk by Gregg Landaker, Gary Rizzo and Mark Weingarten
 
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Best Film Editing: Baby Driver by Paul Machliss and Jonathan Amos
 
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Best Sound Editing: Blade Runner 2049 by Mark A. Mangini and Theo Green
 
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Best Visual Effects: War for the Planet of the Apes by Joe Letteri, Daniel Barrett, Dan Lemmon and Joel Whist
 
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Best Makeup and Hairstyling: Darkest Hour by Kazuhiro Tsuji, David Malinowski and Lucy Sibbick
 
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Best Costume Design: Phantom Thread by Mark Bridges
 
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Best Production Design: Beauty and the Beast by Sarah Greenwood and Katie Spencer
 
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Best Original Song: “This is Me” from The Greatest Showman by Benj Pasek, Justin Paul
 
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 Best Original Score: The Shape of Water by Alexandre Desplat
 
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Best Animated Short: Negative Space \ Max Porter and Ru Kuwahata
 
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Best Live Action Short: The Eleven O’Clock | Derin Seale and Josh Lawson
 
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Best Documentary Short: Heroin(e) | Elaine McMillion Sheldon and Kerrin James Sheldon
 
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Best Foreign Language Film: A Fantastic Woman (Chile)
 
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Best Animated Feature: Loving Vincent | Dorota Kobiela, Hugh Welchman and Ivan Mactaggart
 
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Best Documentary Feature: Last Men in Aleppo | Kareem Abeed, Søren Steen Jespersen and Feras Fayyad
 
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It’s important to know that the nominations already made history in some of the categories:

  1. Best Cinematography: Mudbound‘s Rachel Morrison became the first woman cinematographer ever to be nominated for an Oscar.
  2. Best Foreign Language Film: Ziad Doueiri‘s The Insult became the first Lebanese film ever to be nominated for an Oscar.
  3. Best Director: Dunkirk‘s Christopher Nolan‘s first nomination ever in this category and Lady Bird‘s Greta Gerwig became the fifth woman to be nominated in this category.
  4. Best Actor in a Supporting Role: All the Money in the World‘s 88-year-old legend Christopher Plummer became the oldest nominee for acting in the Academy’s history.
  5. Best Adapted Screenplay: Logan became the first live-action superhero film to be nominated in this category.

But what’s sure is that at least one of these categories will make history in the career of one of the nominees who’s the most common predicted winner: Gary Oldman for Best Actor in a Leading Role for his portrayal of Winston Churchill in Darkest Hour.

Where to watch the Oscars this Sunday hosted by Jimmy Kimmel: ABC Channel / OSN Movies HD Channel / Canal+ Channel / VOX Cinemas in Lebanon (and other sources depending on the country that you live in)


© Cinetrotter, 2014-2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Cinetrotter with appropriate and specific direction to the original content

Lebanese Cinema’s Journey at the Venice Film Festival throughout the years

La Biennale di Venezia is currently celebrating its 74th edition with a variety of films by acclaimed filmmakers from around the world. The spotlight in this edition is on the Lebanese film The Insult which is Ziad Doueiri’s fourth feature film and his first one to get in the official competition of the festival. The film was very well received by the international audience in Venice and by the press. While Doueiri is waiting for the jury’s final decision to perhaps bring home Lebanon’s first Golden Lion Award, we wanted to write this post to pay tribute to him and to his fellow Lebanese filmmakers who also took part of the festival in the past few years.

RANDA CHAHAL SABBAG

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Starting with the ladies, the late Lebanese filmmaker Randa Chahal Sabbag who passed away in 2008 from cancer, is one of the most celebrated female filmmakers in Lebanon and the Arab world.

She’s one of the very first ladies to become a director in the cinematic field. Here’s a look at her participation at the Venice Film Festival:

  1. Screens of Sand / Ecrans de Sable (1991)

In a city in the middle of the desert, the passionate friendship of ladies, Sarah and Mariam. One who saw the day after the oil boom and thinks that she can have everything with the power of money, the other is a survival of the war in Lebanon. In this desert, between bans and conflicts, the tension rises.

It was Chahal’s very first feature film. It premiered on September 8, 1991 at La Biennale di Venezia in the official selection.

  1. A Civilized People / Civilisées (1999)

While working in the city, a young woman finds love in the midst of war with an Arab soldier.

This film also premiered on September 4, 1999 at the festival in the official selection and was awarded the UNESCO Prize, before heading to the Toronto International Film Festival. Unfortunately, the film was banned in Lebanon because of some dialogues and characters.

  1. The Kite / Le Cerf-Volant (2003)

A young 15-year-old girl, Lamia, from a Druze community, who is forced to marry her cousin across the Israeli border, but finds herself in love with an Israeli soldier.

It is her last film which premiered on August 30, 2003 at the 60thVenice Film Festival as part of the Official Competition. It was nominated for the Golden Lion. Despite not winning the Golden Lion, she won 3 awards: the Silver Lion Grand Jury Prize, the Lanterna Magica Award and the Cinema for Peace Award.

Closing ceremony of the 60th Venice Film Festival in Venice, Italy on September 6th, 2003

4 years later, she took part of the jury of the Premio Venezia Opera Prima Luigi De Laurentiis section which was presided by the American producer Bill Mechanic. Today, her family is working on releasing very soon all her films as well as the scripts that she wrote but couldn’t turn into movies.

 

NADINE LABAKI

nadine_labaki.jpgThe second filmmaker who made it to Venice is the well-known female director Nadine Labaki. She took part of the Orizzonti (Horizons) jury at the 69th edition of the festival, awarding the Hong Kong documentary film Three Sisters the Best Film Award of the section. The jury was presided by the Italian actress and director Isabella Rossellini.

 

 

MAZEN KHALED

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We don’t want to forget to mention the director Mazen Khaled whose film Martyr is also selected at this year’s 74th Venice Film Festival in the Biennale College Cinema section and got its world premiere there few days ago in the presence of the cast and crew.

 

 

Martyr (2017)

The last day of the life of a young man drowned on the coast of Beirut.

 

ZIAD DOUEIRI

Director Ziad Doueiri poses during a photocall for the movie And last but not least is the Lebanese filmmaker Ziad Doueiri who takes part of the festival for the first time and in the Official Competition alongside internationally acclaimed filmmakers such as Darren Aronosfky, Ai Weiwei, Guillermo Del Toro, Abdellatif Kechiche and Robert Guediguian. The film is written by Doueiri and the screenwriter Joëlle Touma and was described as “gorgeously short and classily acted feature” and “a fascinating piece of work” by The Hollywood Reporter. It will be released on September 14 in Lebanese theaters and on January 26, 2018 in US theaters.

The Insult / L’insulte (2017)

In today’s Beirut, an insult blown out of proportions finds Toni, a Lebanese Christian, and Yasser, a Palestinian refugee, in court. From secret wounds to traumatic revelations, the media circus surrounding the case puts Lebanon through a social explosion, forcing Toni and Yasser to reconsider their lives and prejudices.

 


© Cinetrotter, 2014-2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Cinetrotter with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.